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Old 12-01-2012, 03:22 PM   #1
BrettDiedrich
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Default What next after Blade MSR

Hi im new on this forum (my first post) and have owned a considerable amount of coaxials and then a few months ago got the Blade MSR which i am quit good at??? what heli should i think about getting next?

note: I have a DX6i
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Old 12-02-2012, 11:27 AM   #2
FFF_Ferret
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Hey, welcome to HeliFreak!

What you get next depends on how ambitious you are (and budget, of course). I, too, went from coaxials to an MSR. From there, the next heli that actually allowed me to progress into new skills was the mCPX. But there are some issues to consider.

I found that after the MSR, I was ready for a collective pitch heli. There are some real frustrations in flying a fixed pitch heli that just go away when you fly a CP. For instance, I found that the MSR was hard to control in fast forward flight. It always wanted to nose dive. A CP heli requires a lot more constant stick input, but it sort of goes where you tell it to go - fewer surprises.

A bigger CP heli, like a T-Rex 450, can be more stable than a smaller one like the mCPX, but I found that with a little expo in my radio (also a DX6i), I could tame the mCPX enough that it was pretty easy. However, once I started trying to learn inverted flight, the mCPX was a handful. Very hard to flip. I got it eventually, but it was rough.

What REALLY moved my skills forward was my Walkera V120D02s - very easy to fly, and flip. But you have to use a Walkera transmitter for that, which is annoying when you already have a DX6i.

So I would say take a look at the Blade 130x - it's a similar size and performance level as the V120D02s, but you can use your transmitter, and it's easy to get parts for.

You could go straight to a 450, but crashes on those are expensive, and require a bit more skill to repair. And you're going to crash. So you want to be able to afford parts. So a 130x and a big box of spares would be a good way to go.

If you want really cheap repairs, you could get a Nano CPx - but you'll mostly be limited to indoor flying with that.

Eventually you'll want to invest in a good sim for your computer, too. They can be expensive, but it will really move your skills forward.
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Walkera V120D02s
T-Rex 450 Pro V2 (iKon FBL, Castle Ice Lite 50)
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Old 12-02-2012, 11:42 AM   #3
BrettDiedrich
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FFF_Ferret View Post
Hey, welcome to HeliFreak!

What you get next depends on how ambitious you are (and budget, of course). I, too, went from coaxials to an MSR. From there, the next heli that actually allowed me to progress into new skills was the mCPX. But there are some issues to consider.

I found that after the MSR, I was ready for a collective pitch heli. There are some real frustrations in flying a fixed pitch heli that just go away when you fly a CP. For instance, I found that the MSR was hard to control in fast forward flight. It always wanted to nose dive. A CP heli requires a lot more constant stick input, but it sort of goes where you tell it to go - fewer surprises.

A bigger CP heli, like a T-Rex 450, can be more stable than a smaller one like the mCPX, but I found that with a little expo in my radio (also a DX6i), I could tame the mCPX enough that it was pretty easy. However, once I started trying to learn inverted flight, the mCPX was a handful. Very hard to flip. I got it eventually, but it was rough.

What REALLY moved my skills forward was my Walkera V120D02s - very easy to fly, and flip. But you have to use a Walkera transmitter for that, which is annoying when you already have a DX6i.

So I would say take a look at the Blade 130x - it's a similar size and performance level as the V120D02s, but you can use your transmitter, and it's easy to get parts for.

You could go straight to a 450, but crashes on those are expensive, and require a bit more skill to repair. And you're going to crash. So you want to be able to afford parts. So a 130x and a big box of spares would be a good way to go.

If you want really cheap repairs, you could get a Nano CPx - but you'll mostly be limited to indoor flying with that.

Eventually you'll want to invest in a good sim for your computer, too. They can be expensive, but it will really move your skills forward.
I do have Phoenix 4.0.m for my computer already. I might go with the mcpx and tone it down with the beginner settings. And then get the blade 450 3D or 450X when I'm good with the mcpx.
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Old 12-02-2012, 12:02 PM   #4
CaptHal8HS
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I agree with FFF_Ferret. I had an mSRX and loved it, but FFF was a bear. So I bought an mCPX and haven't looked back. I'd say it's better than a sim because it's the real thing that you could fly in your yard - that is if your yard is big like mine. It's easy enough to work on and repair and there are plenty of people on the forum with settings that will tame it down. I was so scared to go to the mCPX because of stress related to the settings. But believe me, it can be done! I even have a block of settings I can post if you go that route. Just PM me and I'll shoot them over.
I say, go for an mCPX. Then move up to the 130X V2 when it comes out. From there, you should have enough skill to fly a larger heli. I don't recommend the 450 as it's just too twitchy. I'm going to for a TREX 550 after the first of the year. Much more stable and the new DFC kit is awesome!
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SPEKTRUM DX9, DX8 | iCharger 306B | Meanwell 1000W-RSP
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Old 12-02-2012, 12:24 PM   #5
BrettDiedrich
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so from reading all kinds of other threads on other sites I got a bit confused but now I think my plan is to learn the MSR for a another month or two, and then I'll get the MCPX V2, which I will learn to hover CP and do circuits and the whole deal. Then I will either get the 130X or 300x or an equivalent and really start 3D. Then from there I spouse it really doesnt matter what heli you get.

note: the end goal is a goblin 630
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Old 12-05-2012, 08:27 AM   #6
FFF_Ferret
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrettDiedrich View Post
so from reading all kinds of other threads on other sites I got a bit confused but now I think my plan is to learn the MSR for a another month or two, and then I'll get the MCPX V2, which I will learn to hover CP and do circuits and the whole deal. Then I will either get the 130X or 300x or an equivalent and really start 3D. Then from there I spouse it really doesnt matter what heli you get.

note: the end goal is a goblin 630
That's probably a good plan. It's a tough call about what to start 3D on. Learning 3D is so much easier on a bigger heli, I think. But it's also really nice to not worry about a time-consuming and expensive rebuild when you crash. I beat the heck out of my mcpx learning to flip over into an inverted hover. No way I could have done that with my 450. Just be aware of the mcpx's limitations. The tail blows out VERY easily. But this won't be a very noticeable problem for you until you start trying to go inverted.

The other tough thing is having the discipline to really drill in the sim on the more boring skills. I got way too impatient to get inverted. So now I can hover inverted nose-in, but I can't even consistently hover side-in in normal orientation. This "running before you can walk" syndrome can really hold you back because you learn bad habits. Don't skimp on the sim time. (I say this knowing full well that I'm guilty of it.)

I'll also say there's a big jump going from Blade helis to more kit-based stuff like Align, Gaui, Compass, Mikado, or SAB. Not so much in the way they fly (the Blade 450X is pretty badass), but just in the overall component quality, but also in the skills you need to set them up and repair them. Just be aware that if you start messing with kits like that, you'll end up buying way more in new tools and supplies than you anticipated. My helicopter tools now take up more space on my pegboard in my garage than my automotive tools do.

But it's all fun - even the setup and repair.

Good luck!
__________________
Blade NanoCPx
Walkera V120D02s
T-Rex 450 Pro V2 (iKon FBL, Castle Ice Lite 50)
DX8
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:49 PM   #7
BrettDiedrich
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FFF_Ferret View Post
That's probably a good plan. It's a tough call about what to start 3D on. Learning 3D is so much easier on a bigger heli, I think. But it's also really nice to not worry about a time-consuming and expensive rebuild when you crash. I beat the heck out of my mcpx learning to flip over into an inverted hover. No way I could have done that with my 450. Just be aware of the mcpx's limitations. The tail blows out VERY easily. But this won't be a very noticeable problem for you until you start trying to go inverted.

The other tough thing is having the discipline to really drill in the sim on the more boring skills. I got way too impatient to get inverted. So now I can hover inverted nose-in, but I can't even consistently hover side-in in normal orientation. This "running before you can walk" syndrome can really hold you back because you learn bad habits. Don't skimp on the sim time. (I say this knowing full well that I'm guilty of it.)

I'll also say there's a big jump going from Blade helis to more kit-based stuff like Align, Gaui, Compass, Mikado, or SAB. Not so much in the way they fly (the Blade 450X is pretty badass), but just in the overall component quality, but also in the skills you need to set them up and repair them. Just be aware that if you start messing with kits like that, you'll end up buying way more in new tools and supplies than you anticipated. My helicopter tools now take up more space on my pegboard in my garage than my automotive tools do.

But it's all fun - even the setup and repair.

Good luck!
There are lots of people at my field with YEARS of experience that can hold my hand, so to speak, when I start kit building
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