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3D Printing Discuss 3D printed items and 3D printers as they relate to RC


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Old 11-27-2016, 03:40 AM   #1
brw0513
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Default Pls Recommend a 3D Printer and Material

I'm keen to design my own fan and fan shroud for the OS GT15HZ engine.

SolidWorks tutorials are next on the list

Can you please recommend a 3D printer and material for the job?

A print volume of around 200mm x 200mm x 200mm would be enough for the job.

My budget is around US$1200.

Happy to assemble the printer from a kit to get better value for money.

Thanks.
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Old 12-06-2016, 06:07 AM   #2
dr dremel
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From what I could gather in the last weeks of research the Prusa i3 mk2 seems to be where its at in 2016. Cant help much with the materials, but nylon is quite a bit stronger than the usual PLA. For designing a fan for an IC engine you probably should take a look at temperature resistance of the different materials.

Hope that helps a bit
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Old 12-06-2016, 07:24 AM   #3
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3D printing a Fan and shroud is not easy. You would want a printer with a double extruder so that you could bridge overhangs using a material like PVA that can be easily removed to give you the final shapes.
The fan also has to be strong to withstand the G forces of high speed rotation. Maybe it could be done with Nylon, with a good accurate setup that layers well.
Your normal hobby 3D printers are fine for static items like simple mounts and the like that can be built up from a flat base. And these printers while fine printing PLA struggle with temperatures for ABS, and require upgrades for Nylon.
PLA is not very strong, ABS is stronger, Nylon is stronger again, but each one is harder than the other to print.
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Old 12-07-2016, 09:42 AM   #4
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Esun PETG has the strength of ABS and extrudes at around 242C. I have a Makergear M2 printer and it has worked flawless for me for over a year now. its over your budget but well worth the extra money.

Last edited by garyl; 12-08-2016 at 08:11 PM.. Reason: Temperature correction
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Old 12-07-2016, 08:48 PM   #5
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I do like eSun PETG but the product description states
  • Recommended Extrusion/Nozzle Temperature 230C - 250C
I've made a shroud adapter for the Gaui NX4 gasser engine and it stands up to the temp okay provided you avoid direct shroud contact with the engine. I think a fan would be another level of 3d printing. WRT materials, some people have make amazing things with home 3d printing. Watch the videos at OpenRC 1:10 4WD Truggy Concept RC Car. I've lived long enough to learn never to say never
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Old 12-08-2016, 08:15 PM   #6
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You are correct, brain fade when I post that temperature. Edited the post with the correct temperature 242C.
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Old 12-10-2016, 02:03 PM   #7
extrapilot
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Brw-

If you have access, the earlier versions of the XYZ platform (DaVinci) can support the volume in question, and with a simple firmware upgrade to Repetier .92, can run 250C extrusion, stock- no upgrades needed.

The advantage to their platform is that they intended to make their money on filament cartridges (the sell razor blades, not razors strategy). Except, with the new firmware, you bypass that and can run any filament the meets the specs for the printer (temp range and diameter). So, they were/are available relatively cheaply (I think I got one for about $250USD new). People talk the thing down because of its price, but again- that price is artificially low. You get an enclosed printer, with a heated bed, and a stock extruder that can print nylon all day, for a fraction of the cost of other similar systems.

Reasonable people can disagree on this, but largely, the output quality of the print has much more to do with your slicer software and settings you define for the print. The speed of the print, and maximum size, has more to do with the design of the machine. Things get expensive fast when you start running fast AND clean- where you need a stiff machine, with more power in the drives to handle higher accelerations of the head, etc.

There are simple upgrades to the hot end, from companies like B3 and others, which can allow you to print engineering materials (PET, Polycarbonate, etc) that require 300C-400C temperatures. That applies to most any printer you select, if the firmware supports it or can be replaced by firmware which can.

You may be much better off contracting with a 3rd party for this, unless you plan on using the thing more than a couple times a month. There are a slew of companies that will take an STL file upload, and print in anything from plastic to titanium.
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Old 12-10-2016, 07:19 PM   #8
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You said you're using solid Works? I've recently looked at their software, but with a $4000.00 US dollars price I've declined.
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Old 12-11-2016, 05:19 AM   #9
brw0513
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Thanks for all the replies - much appreciated.

I should have been clearer. The fan itself will be milled from aluminium. It is only the shroud that I intend to print.

Extrapilot - thanks for the tip about the DaVinci printers.

There is a student edition of SolidWorks that is around US$150 for a 12 month subscription.
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Old 12-12-2016, 09:00 AM   #10
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If you are or were in the military service you can get the SW student version for $20.
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Old 12-17-2016, 04:07 PM   #11
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I'd say go for the FolgerTech FT5 (~$500) and Fusion 360 which is free and has 3D printing and CAM for CNC as well as simulating stresses on parts.
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Old 01-07-2017, 01:55 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garyl View Post
If you are or were in the military service you can get the SW student version for $20.
I was not aware of this. Just sent in my request. Big thanks!
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