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Old 02-06-2013, 03:05 AM   #61
brianapp
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I got a much better flow. I think it was mainly due to the wrong type of solder. It was 60/40 rosin core but it was the general hardware type and about as thick as cooked spaghetti. Maybe the rosin was too old (10+ years) and wasn't doing its job. I got some new, thin solder and it flows like it should.

A question.
It was said that reflow is to be avoided but isn't tinning first then joining the same as reflow? How can you do a bullet connector if you don't reflow? Unless I don't tin the cup it pools in the bottom anyway. If you do manage to just tin the sides when you put the wire in and heat it isn't that reflow? The only way I can see for no reflow in a bullet would be to not tin the cup and push the solder in the wire cup joint as you heat it.
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Old 02-06-2013, 10:38 AM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianapp View Post
It was said that reflow is to be avoided ...
Reflow to be avoided? ? whaa???

Perhaps there is some difference on what people mean by reflow. Of course there is always going to be reflow. You've got to melt what's there to have the new solder bind with it. True that the "tinning" is a very thin coating and you will likely be adding additional solder to make the joint, but reflow is definitely one of the solder techniques out there. It depends on the situation. For surface mount components, for example, it is the only way.

For soldering a wire into a cup, I would tin the wire, and the cup. Depending on the size of the cup, you might be able to get a thin tin on the inside of the cup. In that case, you can insert the wire into the cup, heat and add solder to get a nice fill.

I've had cases though where, with tiny micro connectors, or micro cups that are already filled with solder, I've heated the connector and inserted the tinned and fluxed wired into or onto the molten solder and held it there while the solder cooled. You have to be really careful here not to create a "cold solder joint". The solder on the wire must melt and merge into the existing solder. Perhaps not the preferred technique, but sometimes you need it. If the joint is not perfect, you can apply some flux and reflow. The alternative would be taking everything apart, solder-wicking or sucking the excess solder off and starting over. Most of the time in real practice, this is completely unnecessary. You do need the experience to know if the solder joint is good or not though,
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Old 02-07-2013, 04:55 PM   #63
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Reflow isn't the end of the world, but using it to make the main connection, should not be the main go to technique. Don't coat the parts with a lot of solder and then heat the parts up and let the solder on the parts melt together. (that is what real reflow is... using a lot of solder first, then reheating, and not adding more solder)

Don't fill the cup with solder first unless you just can not get it to work any other way.

The reason why that method (and reflow in general) should be avoided... is that you may not get the solder on both parts to melt evenly and meld together properly at the microscopic level... especially doing the prefill method on bullet connectors.

If you have a nice new and clean cup style connector, tinning it first isn't quite as necessary.

Just tin the wire, insert it into the wire cup (after you add a little flux to the cup) then heat the cup and melt solder onto the wire and let it wick/flow into the cup.

During school, we were not allowed to get solder on the outside of the cup... that was a pain.
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:47 AM   #64
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Marine6680,

Excellent briefing. I drive the bus, but am also an (to use the British term)" 'Ands in Pockets". It goes with everything the FAA teaches without spending a fortune! You guys are getting a great deal! Learn it and use it.
Works good on boats too ...... just be sure to use LPS3.
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Old 02-22-2013, 11:25 AM   #65
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Thank you
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Old 05-28-2013, 04:42 AM   #66
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I was looking for such kind of tutorial for last month but i could not find any proper tutorial but you have explained it very well. Thnaks
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Old 07-22-2013, 02:25 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marine6680 View Post
Just tin the wire, insert it into the wire cup (after you add a little flux to the cup) then heat the cup and melt solder onto the wire and let it wick/flow into the cup.
Thanks for the tutorial, that's just how I do my XT-60's, it works great, nicely smooth & shiny with no excess.

However I need your assistance:
Going through tips at an alarming rate.

Have a 45 Watt Craftsman "wand" Model 113540420 and a Craftsman 230/150 watt gun.
Have tried lower end with same results, one that lasted a bit more was a 50 watt Radio Shack with a variable pot control.
Solder is 96% tin 4% silver with rosin core. About 22 gauge I guess.
Using just a little flux to get things started
Have not dipped it in flux or colder substance for that matter
AC volt. is 125 VAC
Clean tip on moist sponge, no sanding, no steel/metallic wool, just the sponge.
On the 45 I usually disconnect it when not used for 5 min. or more.

The problem is; no matter what I do, my tips don't last (5 to 10 rounds each) and if I want a clean job, have to change tips which will be short lived. The first couple of jobs are outstanding but afterwards is back to the globs

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks
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Old 07-23-2013, 01:42 PM   #68
Marine6680
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Originally Posted by Felix the cat View Post
Thanks for the tutorial, that's just how I do my XT-60's, it works great, nicely smooth & shiny with no excess.

However I need your assistance:
Going through tips at an alarming rate.

---- Snip ----

The problem is; no matter what I do, my tips don't last (5 to 10 rounds each) and if I want a clean job, have to change tips which will be short lived. The first couple of jobs are outstanding but afterwards is back to the globs

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks
Its quite possible you are doing nothing wrong.

Iron plated tips can erode fast sometimes even when using care. This is why I like Hakko (and a few other quality brands) irons and tips. The tip construction is such that it lasts longer.

Also the type of solder you use will affect the tip life as well. My recommended lead solder of 63/37 is very easy on tips compared to some other types. Lead free is killer on tips... The solder you listed as using is about 4-5 times harsher on tips than lead solder.

Using a tip that is too small will accelerate wear of the tip as well.

My favorite soldering iron and tips are from Pace... I could use one of their tips every day for hours each day... for months... a year... heck maybe more if I was the only one to touch that iron. Plus they have an awesome tip design that makes excessive solder on the connection almost impossible... or at least difficult. They even received a patent on the tip design. Plus the accuracy of their temp holding is excellent... making soldering at lower temps easier. Problem is they are not the cheapest... Their cheapest soldering station/iron will cost you $175-200 online. And if you get the model that has the special tip with a built in heating element, the tips are crazy expensive too. (a used unit might be found online for cheap though, plus they have models that use standard style tips that are reasonable to replace) If I did more soldering though, I would own one.

Look at me... praddling on in a tangent. I hope I answered your question though.
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Old 08-19-2013, 09:11 PM   #69
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thanks for the info, really helpful
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Old 08-20-2013, 03:54 PM   #70
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thanks for the info, really helpful
Here to help.
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Old 09-17-2013, 01:37 PM   #71
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I'm a bit confused about a comment you made. In your video, (Part 2) you apply solder to the iron, place the iron on both the wire and the connector and then add a bit more solder (if I saw it correctly).

Regarding someone else's video:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marine6680 View Post
Also, notice he heats the components with the iron and applies the solder to the component. He is not putting solder on the iron and then using the iron to apply the melted solder. Putting a bunch of solder on the tip to get the solder to the part is called shoveling, and is not good technique.
I do not understand the difference between what you did in your video and what you have described as shoveling.

Can you clarify for me? Thanks! This is a great post!!
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Old 09-18-2013, 12:19 AM   #72
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A little drop of molten solder on the tip of the iron helps form a "thermal bridge" with the work, thus transferring heat much more efficiently than a dry tip. The bulk of the solder for the joint should be applied to the work directly.
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Old 09-18-2013, 05:03 PM   #73
Marine6680
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyboydrury09 View Post
I'm a bit confused about a comment you made. In your video, (Part 2) you apply solder to the iron, place the iron on both the wire and the connector and then add a bit more solder (if I saw it correctly).

Regarding someone else's video:


I do not understand the difference between what you did in your video and what you have described as shoveling.

Can you clarify for me? Thanks! This is a great post!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. M View Post
A little drop of molten solder on the tip of the iron helps form a "thermal bridge" with the work, thus transferring heat much more efficiently than a dry tip. The bulk of the solder for the joint should be applied to the work directly.
^ What they said.

Shoveling is applying solder to the tip with the sole purpose of using that solder alone to make the final connection. (the amount applied to the tip for this purpose, is relative to the size of the joint being made)

Had I been trying to connect a wire to a terminal, and applied a blob of solder to the iron, then touched the iron to the joint I was making, let that solder flow into the joint, then pulled the iron away... That is shoveling.

Or to put it another way... You are literally using the iron tip as a shovel to transport solder to the joint, rather than bringing the solder to the joint directly.
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Old 09-18-2013, 05:06 PM   #74
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I understand now! Thanks everyone!!
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Old 11-26-2013, 10:11 PM   #75
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Default Re: How to solder correctly (a not so brief lesson) Plus tips and more...

I used to use a 15/30 watt radio shack iron with some cheap shack solder. I had to use a propane torch on the iron to be able to solder 8 Guage to my dean's.

I just bought a TrakPower TK-950 Soldering Station and WOW! what an incredible difference! Love it love it! After reading this thread I just ordered some 63/37 Kester #245. 02 solder.

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Old 12-02-2013, 11:41 AM   #76
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Good equipment and supplies make the difference.
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Old 12-17-2013, 11:55 PM   #77
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Thanks for the great thread and all the tips. Due to you, I switched from silver solders to 63/37 rosin core solder. I used a 30W and a 60W soldering irons by Hobbico for years, but now I also have permanent access to a TK-950 because my son is OCD and wants me to keep the soldering station at my house instead of his own, haha. Works for me. But great solder and great equipment still doesn't make me a great solderer until I get more experience with these bullet connectors used in helis, and larger gauge wires like in my Goblin 500 now being assembled. I can only get better using the tips you have shared. Thanks a LOT! Jon
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Old 12-28-2013, 08:09 PM   #78
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Glad you found it helpful.
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Old 12-31-2013, 03:36 AM   #79
togy
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Default How to solder correctly (a not so brief lesson) Plus tips and more...

Marine, do you have any tips or tricks when soldering tiny stuff, like wires to circuits boards on micros etc?
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Old 01-03-2014, 12:54 PM   #80
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Yeah... Start with a small tip (try your best to get it task appropriate in size, with relation to the part and circuit trace) and start on low temp about 600*F. Then see how that works and adjust from there.

Use a third hand device if needed. Also keep the iron tip out of direct contact with the board substrate material as much as possible, to minimize damage to it.

Get a magnifying lamp, that will help see the small components.

In the end a steady hand will be your friend.
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